Masonic Interest

Heaven not a Myth...

Heaven is not a Myth...

...A description of the infirmities of age. All is vanity: also a warning of the judgment to come...

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Between Friends...

Sacred Brotherhood of Man...Fatherhood of God...

The Internal...

to seek the light within the heart...

When two or three are gathered...in thy name

God is speaking to us as in unity...

The Pilgrims Path...

Discover a narrow path guiding the way towards the truth...

The Word...

Our Rule and Guide to a well found Faith...

With Thoughtful Prayer...

Come as a child of your own free will to discover wisdom..

God is Speaking...

When we meet; congregate with unity of faith and promise...

But those who hope in the Lord...

...they will soar on wings like eagles; run and not grow weary...

Brothers whom trust...

...gain a sacred truth...about our Elder Brother Emmanuel

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A Brother Mason In Alaska

 
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Heaven is not a Myth...

I would like to share thought here, my friends, to "Heaven is not a Myth," and how the situation would describe in the Book of Ecclesiastes the author King Solomon, the teacher or preacher, described his search for the key to the meaning of life, or vanity. That search, however, became an exercise in futility because the more King Solomon sought for the answers to life, the more he discovered that life itself is unique, that human wisdom is woefully insufficient, and that death continually laughed in his face. He had it all, but nearing the end of his life, he equates personal accomplishments with vanity. King Solomon understood that satisfaction in life does not come through riches or the accumulation of things or even personal accomplishments. Incidentally, "vanity" here means "emptiness."

People would desire opportunity to pursue every pleasure; then follow their desires, but were assured through situation our Creator will call all into judgment. How many give loose to every appetite, and rush into every vicious pleasure! But God registers every one of sinful thoughts and desires, idle words and wicked words. If they would avoid remorse and terror, if they would have hope and comfort on a dying bed, if they would escape misery here and hereafter, let them remember the vanity of youthful pleasures. That Solomon means to condemn the pleasures of transgression is evident. His object is to draw the young to purer and more lasting joys. This is not the language of one grudging youthful pleasures, because he can no longer partake of them; but of one who has, by a miracle of mercy, been brought back in safety, soundness of the heart. He would persuade the young from trying a course whence so few return. If the young would live a life of true happiness, if they would secure happiness hereafter, let them remember their Creator in the days of their youth.

The wise and penitent preacher is here closing his sermon; and he closes it, not only like a good orator, but like a good preacher, with that which was likely to make the best impressions and which he wished might be powerful and lasting upon his hearers. Here is, an exhortation to young people to begin betimes to be faithful to our Creator and not to put it off to old age, enforced with arguments taken from the calamities of old age and the great change that leaving a spirtual death will make upon us.

A repetition of the great truth he had undertaken to prove in this discourse, the vanity of the world. A confirmation and recommendation of what he had written in this and his other books, as worthy to be duly weighed and concluded, with a charge to all to be truly spirtual and trust the words of wisdom, in consideration of the judgment to come. By these secrets, then, is not meant some definite precise information that can be imparted to or withheld from another person at will, but the arcane truths inherent in the faith itself; truths needing to be extracted from it, like poetry or music from the printed page, by personal free will and effort that can be recognised as truths only by the inward responsiveness of the soul itself after deeply meditating and assimilating them. Hence we are taught that they are matters of the heart, and that they are communicable only to brethren and fellows (that is, to those whose minds have developed a common measure of spirituality), and then not orally, but only by means of signs, tokens and perfect points of entrance.

For just as to enter into perception and understanding of the outer world we need our five outward-pointing senses, so for perception and appreciation of the inner world, we need a corresponding inward sensorium. The pentagram or five pointed star indicates our five points of entrance into relations with the world of sense and phenomena by the limited imperfect channels of the senses; and, to cognise the secret things of supra-sensual life, we must have developed corresponding, but perfect points of entrance into it in the form of soulfaculty, inward vision, inward audition. Hence inward truths and mysteries are inevitably and automatically secret from those who have not yet acquired perfect points of entrance to them, not because of any capricious withholding of them by some better informed person, but because such men are without the appropriate faculty for perceiving them; their inner vision is as yet hoodwinked, darkened, and prevented from recognizing them.

We say these words not to persuade, but to tickle your intellect to discover what few find - true strength in all situations and happiness within the heart, all the best, and may our Father in Heaven be with you and bless you through all time.

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